Manning, Anthony - Islets in Pink Polypropylene (LP)

Manning, Anthony - Islets in Pink Polypropylene (LP)

Katalog: Musik
EAN: 4251804125161
Bestellnummer: 80412516
Veröffentlichung: 09.04.2021
Set-Inhalt: 1
Format: Vinyl LP
Verpackung: Vinyl
Genre: Techno/House/Electronica
Label: Mental Groove Records
Anbieter: WAS Word and Sound
Preiscode: 292
Barcode:
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Erstaunliches und legendäres 1994er Album auf dem ebenso erstaunlichen wie legendären Irdial... mehr
Produktinformationen "Manning, Anthony - Islets in Pink Polypropylene (LP)"
Erstaunliches und legendäres 1994er Album auf dem ebenso erstaunlichen wie legendären Irdial Disc-Label, das in den Emil Berliner Studios im Half Speed Mastering remastered wurde.

One of The 50 best IDM albums of all time Pitchfork

Das gesamte Album wurde auf der Roland R8 Drum Maschine komponiert und realisiert. Jedes Stück bestand aus einer Reihe von Pattern unterschiedlicher Länge (5,6,7 Takte lang). Die Standard-R8-Sounds wurden mit einer von mehreren ROM-Soundlibrary-Cards (meistens der Dance-Card, Nummer 10) verschönert. Diese Patterns wurden erstellt, indem ein Rhythmus getippt und dann in Echtzeit mit dem Pitch-Schieberegler als Loop-Muster improvisierte Melodien für jede Stimme des Patterns erstellt wurden. Die grobe Version jedes Stücks wurde erstellt, indem die Pattern als Lied zusammengefügt wurden, wobei jeder Zusatz immer wieder angehört wurde, um sicherzustellen, dass die Melodien auf vage zusammenhängende Weise ineinander flossen.





The whole album was composed and realized on the Roland R8 drum machine. It followed the same process as the Elastic Variations pieces, with the major addition of many, many hours of editing.



Each piece was composed as a series of patterns, of varying lengths ( 5,6,7 bars long ). The stock R8 sounds were embellished with one of several ROM sound library cards ( mostly the Dance card, number 10 ).



These patterns were created by tapping out a rhythm, then, in real time, using the Pitch slider as the pattern looped, to create improvised melodies for each of the pattern's voices.



The rough version of each piece was built by stitching the patterns together as a song, listening to each addition over and over, to make sure the melodies flowed into each other in a vaguely coherent manner.



Once this initial rough structure was in place I set about fine tuning every single note.



The R8 doesn't allow you to assign a pitch to a note in the conventional sense. It's not possible to assign a pitch of Middle C to the first note of the first bar. Instead, it assigns a numerical value to a note's pitch, between -4800 and +4800 ( I think those numbers are correct - that little screen is seared into my memory ).



If you restrict all notes within a piece to a multiple of, say, 400, you therefore create the possibility of a sort of scale. For multiples of 400, you have a total number of 24 permissable notes. However, most of the percussive sounds, when pitch shifted, only sounded 'good' over a reduced range.



The first editing step was to go through the entire piece, and change every note's pitch to its nearest multiple of 400.



The second step was to draw out the entire piece on graph paper, the Y axis being pitch, X being time. This drawing gave me a visual sense of a melody's flow. It was easy to see too many notes clustering around too tight a pitch range for instance, or a single note straying way down into the lower register while all others at that point in the melody were in the upper.



Once these first 'clearing-up' edits were complete I could set about re-writing elements that didn't sound right melodically. Often this meant stripping out whole chunks of superfluous notes, to reveal a cleaner melody line, then shifting its shape slightly. If the flow of the line of dots on the graph 'looked' balanced and sweetly sinuous, then often it sounded so.



This entire process took many weeks per piece. Weeks of doing almost nothing else. Listening. Re-drawing. Re-writing. Listening. Round and round and round. When I could hear the whole thing in my head, from beginning to end, and nothing seemed to jar ( too excessively ), I knew it was done, time to move on.



I imagine it's very similar to the process of stop animation. Your days are filled with painfully tiny incremental changes that seem to be getting nowhere. Then, slowly, a shape, narrative, starts to appear. Then, all of a sudden, somehow, it's done.



When all the pieces were complete the R8 was taken into Irdial's studio where some simple effects were added, each voice recorded individually for clarity onto 8-track tape and mastered onto an ex-BBC half-inch tape deck.



Then I slept. And vowed never to do it again.



*****



And the title ?



Soon after finishing the pieces I happened to read a magazine article about Christo's Surrounded Islands installation with the music playing in the background.



There was something about a particular cluster of words within a random sentence that seemed pleasing and somehow appropriate.



Islets in Pink Polypropylene seemed to make as much sense as anything else.




Tracks:
A1. Untitled A2. Untitled B1. Untitled B2. Untitled  B3. Untitled